Fotos

February Project, Part 1

February 1: Lori trained last summer and fall to run the Pasadena half marathon. Unfortunately, she didn’t run that morning due to the fires and poor air quality. She made up for that by running the Huntington Beach half marathon. The parents, Adrian and I went to cheer her on, but missed her (and she missed us) at mile 4 and at the finish line on PCH. Sigh. Our “¡Sí se puede!” and “Lori rocks!” signs were appreciated, but not always correctly pronounced. I heard “sí me puedo,” “sí ses puedes,” “sí se puedo” and other aberrations. To be fair, lots of people were able to correctly pronounce the phrase.
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Fotos

Cindy vs. Piñata (early 80s version)

I had no problem with piñatas as a kid. I was happy to swing a bat or a stick at one in hopes of getting some candy (if I was lucky and not trampled by my older, bigger cousins).

Exhibit 1: First birthday party, 1981

Exhibit 2: Danny’s 4th birthday party, 1982

Exhibit 3: Christmas Eve festivities, 1982

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Escuela

A twist on a common narrative

A long-time reader sent me the LA Times’ latest story on the plight of the undocumented immigrant (or as they say “illegal immigrant”) student at a four-year university.

Before I read the story, I thought it’d be just like many of the other mainstream media stories I’d read about undocumented students. These articles usually focus on the valedictorians and other high achievers. That doesn’t surprise me. It appeals to the many who buy into the meritocratic ideals underlying the myth of the American dream. If only you work hard enough, you can make it!

It’s rare to read a story about the undocumented student who is not at the top of her class, doesn’t have an inflated GPA due to dozens of honors and AP classes, and scored only okay on standardized admissions tests. Yet she does exist, and she deserves an opportunity at higher education too.
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